I have a couple of ideas for an upcoming Research and Creative Projects Award. One is research oriented and the other is purely materially motivated.

1. Travel to conduct research at The Rosenbach Museum and Library in Philadelphia. This institution holds collections of rare books and ephemera.

– A major manuscript of the Canterbury Tales and a noble fragment of another illustrated version.

– Books of the pre-Elizabethan and Elizabethan period, complemented by a collection of commonplace books. Commonplace books, which combine journaling with the collection of ephemera, have been compared to modern blogs.

– Major British authors from the 18th and 19th century—the most extensive collection of Robert Burns manuscripts in existence. There are manuscripts of Walter Scott, William Wordsworth, Charles Lamb, Shelley and Keats (including a celebrated love letter to Fanny Brawne) and the only surviving fragment of Fitzgerald’s Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam.

– An excellent Dickens collection, extending from the earliest extant manuscript to a carte-de-viste photo signed on the day before his death, also includes Dickens’ manuscripts of Nicholas Nickleby and the Pickwick Papers.

– Lewis Carroll—over six hundred letters, early drawings, presentation books, photographs and his own first-edition copy of Alice in Wonderland.

– The handwritten manuscript of James Joyce’s Ulysses.

– The three earliest existing books printed in the western hemisphere —Mexico 1543-44, Lima 1584-85, and the legendary Bay Psalm Book, the first book printed in what is now the United States (Cambridge, Massachusetts 1661).

– The American Revolution is documented with over one hundred letters written by George Washington, the original manuscript resolution of the Continental Congress, a superb collection of documents by signers of the Declaration of Independence, Commodore Barry’s ship papers, which outline the beginnings of the American navy, and a set of Franklin’s Poor Richard’s Almanacs, including the only known surviving copy of the 1733 first edition, first printing.

– Early diaries and traveler’s accounts, printed pocket guides and histories, including diaries of the Oregon pioneers and the document signed by Andrew Johnson authorizing Seward to negotiate for the purchase of Alaska.

 

2.  Supplies —namely super standard porcelain.

An advanced, high quality kaolin developed for super white firing products. Super Standard Porcelain offers high fired whiteness, high green strength and high plasticity

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Revised Plan

After speaking with my instructor, Bryan Czibesz, I have revised my Plan of Action, adding detail and more deadlines (one can never have too many, you know).

Revised Plan of Action

***Work on all projects concurrently. By the time we return from Spring Break, I would like to be at a place where I can narrow my focus or begin to merge my separate projects.

week 5—glaze testing with crystalline glazes ^6; slip testing with nest burnouts

week 6 – three stacks built and bisqued, ready for glaze experimentation. A number of wasps’ nest forms bisqued and ready for glaze/atmospheric firing. Glaze experimentation could continue until Spring Break.

week 8 (midterm)—Interdisciplinary critiques

week 9 – experimental stacked shapes (non-rectangular)

week 11 (post spring break)— Re-assess goals and adjust focus accordingly

week 14—Meet with Thesis Committee

New Semester :: Plan of Action

Plan of Action

Work on all projects concurrently. By the time we return from Spring Break, I would like to be at a place where I can narrow my focus or begin to merge my separate projects.

week five – three stacks built and bisqued, ready for glaze experimentation. A number of wasps’ nest forms bisqued and ready for glaze/atmospheric firing. Glaze experimentation could continue until Spring Break. At which point I hope to be able to choose a more focused approach.

week nine – experimental stacked shapes (non-rectangular)

Post Spring Break – Re-assess goals and adjust focus accordingly

Three Projects:

Ongoing project: Stay functional! Go conceptual! Find a way to make functional objects that are conceptually charged. Keep your records of these projects. Use them in a book for potters about how to survive grad school with your pot intact. (Kidding about the book part, maybe)

 – I want to start writing on pots again. It’s how I record things that I can’t say. Funny thing I’ve learned about writing for the purpose of expressing things you keep hidden—you end up having to explain the very things that you’ve tried to avoid saying. I don’t know how I feel about that yet.

Continue with wasp/hornet nests. Try spraying as a method of application. Try some ^6 slips. Try with crystalline glazes

Make more stacks. Try the rolled shapes that are in sketches. Try to show separate pages folding/rolling back. I want to try a very long stacked form, one that stretches the boundaries of “paper-shaped”. Maybe go on from there to shapes that are not at all encumbered by the concept of paper, not rectangular in any way. If they’re not rectangular will they still be read as paper? Paper-like layers?